The Woodworking Table Saw

A table saw consists of a circular saw blade which protrudes through the surface of a table, the table provides support for boards being cut.




Table Saw Explained: For the Beginner

For all intents and purposes, there are three kinds of table saws. Listed in order of size and cost, they are: Bench-top, Contractor's, and Cabinet. What they all have in common is the fact that they all rely on a table for the stock to pass over, a saw blade that tilts from it's normal vertical position of 90 degrees to the tabletop to anywhere in a range of 45 degrees, and a motor of some type somewhere under the table to drive the blade. How they do it can vary in multitudes of ways within each category.


Introducing the Woodworking Table Saw

The table saw is generally the centerpiece of any work shop, and is the first major purchase of woodworking equipment for most woodworkers. This is one piece of equipment that a lot of thought should be gone into before purchase, including decide exactly how much to spend.


Table Saw Basics

The table saw is probably the single most important piece of equipment to the average woodworker. You need to know exactly what can be done with the table saw, and what should be done with it.


Table Saw Set-up

More than any other piece of woodworking equipment the careful set-up of the table saw will pay off with impressive results.  Take your time do it right.


Using a Table Saw

Using a Table Saw includes using and adjusting the table saw fence system and aligning the blade, along with a variety of jigs or fixtures built for the Table Saw. The table saw is more complicated they most pieces of woodworking equipment, and care should be give that all the parts are set-up to work together.


Choosing the Correct Table Saw

There are a wide variety of table saws on the market, and the table saw you choose is likely to be a workhorse in your shop. The Woodworking Table Saw will likely be with you for years, so do your research and pick the right one for your long-term needs.


Hi-Performance and Sliding Table Saw

With some time and effort it's possible to turn a so-so performer in to a high performing Table Saw.  A properly set-up and maintained table saw will outperform machines that are not, by a wide margin.


Table Saw Tips, and Terminology

Learning the techniques used in woodworking on the table saw will increase your quality output, and reduce your scrap wood. Each different cut on the table saw uses slightly different techniques, learn them all to get the most out of your table saw.


Table Saw Ripping and Cuts

A rip cut is any cut made parallel to the wood grain. A rip saw works like a chisel, lifting off small splinters of wood. Generally saw which rip cut well do not work well for crosscutting, which shears the wood fibers. Table saws are usually used for rip cutting, and a miter saw is used for crosscutting, although it is possible to do either cut on either saw.


Table Saw




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